Ski glamping. It’s a thing. by Natalie Segal

When we first heard about the Points North Heli Tour camp, I imagined the classic winter camp, tent, cold toes scenario. No one could have prepared me for the experience we were about to have. Read more in a story a wrote for Snowsbest.com below.

Downtime at PNH Tour Camp, Alaska. Photo: Zoya Lynch

Downtime at PNH Tour Camp, Alaska. Photo: Zoya Lynch

"As one professional athlete recently commented to me, “why the f**k would you go winter snow camping when, for the same price, you could stay in a nice cosy chalet drinking gluhwein and eating cookies.”

It’s a good argument. I am all for gluhwein and cookies, especially if I am on a ski holiday. Holidays are meant to be relaxing, where you ski all day and drink wine in front of the fire all night- none of this ‘dig out the tent’ malarkey. Why would you go and make more hard work for yourself?

I don’t really have an answer to that question but I do have a solution, winter glamping."

READ MORE at Snowsbest.com

Chamonix, French for out of your comfort zone by Natalie Segal

Showing my sister Anna around Chamonix, my winter home, was one of the highlights of my year. She wrote about her experience for Snowsbest.com. See below.

Anna and I traversing the Argentiere Basin in search of steep ski descents. Photo: Linus Meyer

Anna and I traversing the Argentiere Basin in search of steep ski descents. Photo: Linus Meyer

Words by Anna Segal

"Three years ago, when I decided to redirect my ski career from park skiing to the big mountains, I knew that I would be subjecting myself to an extremely steep learning curb. I felt that over the past few years I had done well to acquire new skills in this area, such as ski touring, terrain choice and avalanche awareness.

But then came Chamonix and I realized how little I actually knew and how much more I had to learn."

READ MORE at Snowsbest.com

Discovering Roger's Pass by Natalie Segal

Earlier this year I spent a week at Roger's Pass, exploring the zone with ski guide Greg Hill and the Finding The Line crew. After a few days of high temperatures and some liquid snow up high, we were surprised to still find powder up high. Following the trip, I did some research on the history of this incredible natural powder resource and wrote a story about the pass for Snowsbest.com. Check it out below!

Stacking pillows on the way up to Ursus Minor, Roger's Pass. Photo: Jarred Martin

Stacking pillows on the way up to Ursus Minor, Roger's Pass. Photo: Jarred Martin

Located near the state line of the British Columbia and Alberta, Rogers Pass connects the towns of Golden,  and Revelstoke. Well known for its rugged, steep and diverse terrain, coupled with the highest average annual snowfall in Canada (12 meters per year on average), it is no wonder that the numbers of winter backcountry visitors rose to 17 000 visitors in 2016.

However, it is not skiing that first made Rogers Pass famous.

Read more at Snowbest.com

Mount Townsend by Natalie Segal

Last year, my sister Anna and I planned a trip to the Main Range in Kosciuszko National Park, NSW. We hadn't skied together in years and had never been backcountry skiing together.

It was five days to remember or howling winds, storms, blood red sunsets and full moons. In turn, this trip inspired us to embark on a two year documentary film project that we have since dubbed Finding The Line.

Check out this film that cinematographer Lachlan Humphreys put together from our trip. A big thanks to Holly Walker, Teddy Laycock, Lachlan Humphreys and Giorgio for their great company!

5 Niseko Stories by Natalie Segal

 

 

During the winter of 2015/2016 My House Pictures, a Higashiyama-based production company, was out and about in Niseko capturing a look at winter with the Niseko apparel company OYUKI's team riders for the new film "5 Niseko Stories".

Part 3 features Nat Segal, a Freeride World Tour competitor and former mogul skier with a love for Niseko's famous powder snow.